Blogging…about blogging.

I am overly excited about this blog post, almost giddy. Not giddy enough to write in use caps locks and explanation points like a N00b, but still pretty excited none the less…

http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/Starting+blog+blog/5427797/story.html

http://mashable.com/2010/03/01/company-blog/

I have managed a personal blog since I was 15 years old. Yes, I was that nerdy kid in a corner cranking out boring blog posts. Nobody read my blog, and I looking at it now, I’m pretty glad they didn’t. This was about the extent of teenage Allee:

Holy Nervousness!!!

I’m going to die if I don’t find out who made senante. My head will explode and i’ll be blown into a million pieces all over the earth. Right about now, your’e probably thing i’m crazi buti’m not. (At least not that I know of) Ever since we voted, i’ve had the jitters. I guess I’ll live….We voted for homecoming royalty but it wont really matter since I cant go this year. :0 I don’t really know who was nominated, but I hope it was good!! 
Today was actually pretty boring and I dont have much more to say, so ill just say good bye (sob sob)

Did it make you cry? Me too. Now, I know this post is about business blogging, and I promise I’ll get to that in a minute. Even though business blogging is different from personal blogging, people tend to make the same mistakes.

  • Grammar, grammar, grammar (if you’re going to write, do it well. If you can’t write, hire somebody that can.)
  • Blogging without a purpose. Nobody wants to waste time reading about nothing
  • Length of a post
  • Only words (no media)
  • The title. If it doesn’t catch a user’s eye in the first place they’ll never read anything you write.

I like Suster’s tips (see Mashable article above) on how to create a successful blog. He hits every major point. People that are looking at a business aren’t searching for an outrageous Youtube video. If they hit your blog, they’re probably looking to have a question answered. If your blog is clear enough to answer the question and keep them entertained (in a non-obnoxious sense), they’ll come back, and you’ll have a steady stream of followers.

I currently work for a company that uses ASAP, an online registration system. ASAP’s customer service is excellent, but they recently released a new support portal/blog that I still can’t seem to grasp. Look at it here: http://support.asapconnected.com/.

I want to use it, I really do. But when I need a question answered fast, am I supposed to take the time to look through every category and article? Usually, I just end up calling the help line which completely defeats the purpose of the portal. It’s not clear. Customers want fast and easy and they’ll only give you 10 seconds on a webpage before they give up.

While Suster treats a blog as something absolutely necessary  for a business, Rick Spence focuses more on how to make a blog relevant, since Blogger hit it’s heyday 4 or 5 years ago.  He says that people don’t blog because it’s hard (and risky) and I agree 100%. To send a tweet or a Facebook message, all you need is 30 seconds and a keyboard. A blog requires thought and opinion, and you risk offending customers.

Oh yes. A blog requires you know how to write which is in short supply these days. Just ask http://literalbearsimjealousof.tumblr.com/.

That being said, following some basic guidelines I think blogging can do much more good than harm. In what other way can you shamelessly promote yourself for FREE? By ‘shamelessly promote’ I don’t mean posting 100000 links that say BUY ME! I mean writing about things that will make your audience say, “Hey, he’s an expert at what he does. I’ll trust him.”

If you’re a childcare business, write about parenting.
If you’re a ice cream company, write about the process of creating your sweet treat
If you’re a CEO, write tips for business owners to succeed.
If you go to BYU, write a post about how sports don’t really matter. After all, it’s just a football team, right? 43 points, not biggie.
Whatever you do, write carefully. Don’t be outlandish. You never know who’s reading.

(Jake Heaps, if you’re reading this post, I apologize. Sort of…)

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3 thoughts on “Blogging…about blogging.

  1. I like your perspective on the articles as well as your perspective on blogging in general. And I thoroughly enjoyed your teenage blog post. I’ve got a couple of those as well. Though your BYU jab was a little painful, I think you made some really good guidelines for what people should write about.

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